Speeches, Interviews & Other Statements

Complete list of 8,000+ Thatcher statements & texts of many of them

1988 Nov 17 Th
Margaret Thatcher

TV Interview for BBC (visiting Washington)

Document type: Speeches, interviews, etc.
Venue: Sheraton-Carlton Hotel, Washington DC
Source: Thatcher Archive: COI transcript
Journalist: Martin Bell, BBC
Editorial comments:

Between 1330 and 1345 MT gave interviews to the British media.

Importance ranking: Major
Word count: 550
Themes: Foreign policy (USA)

MARTIN BELL, BBC TV:

Prime Minister, that was quite a lecture on loyalty you read in their, is that because you think George Bush is under-valued in this country?

PRIME MINISTER:

No, not in any way. I was asked a question by a journalist at the press conference which seemed to indicate that that journalist did not value loyalty very highly. I think loyalty is a very very valued commodity. I think it is a great plus for George Bush that he was loyal to his principles and loyal to his President.

When you have got a person who has demonstrated that loyalty, he is also in a position, when he becomes President, to expect similar loyalty from other people. Loyalty is a good quality.

[end p1]

MARTIN BELL, BBC TV:

He is of course a known quantity to you, Dan Quayle not so much, what did you make of him?

PRIME MINISTER:

I have met him before and I met him twice on this particular visit. He was very very well briefed on all the subjects which were under discussion, very well briefed.

MARTIN BELL, BBC TV:

This seems to have been an unusual Washington visit for you, rather an emotional one, did your eyes mist up a bit sometimes?

PRIME MINISTER:

Yes. First there was great ceremonial and when you get that great ceremonial, when you are given an official welcoming and you see the flags of every State and you know the history and you know that this is the last time, at the end of a very great Presidency, you are bound to feel some great sadness.

But the Americans have just two Presidencies and they are not allowed to stand for a third and President Reagan knows that and so does Mrs Reagan and it is totally accepted, but sad nevertheless, but a very fruitful eight years.

[end p2]

MARTIN BELL, BBC TV:

It is going to be different for you with a new President isn't it?

PRIME MINISTER:

Yes it will be different because we each have a different style. But do not forget it was different for Presidents of America when I came into office but we managed to get on all right, whoever was here, because of the very special relationship.

But it was a specially good, fruitful relationship between President Reagan and myself because we believed the same principles and we both had the same resolve.

MARTIN BELL, BBC TV:

Do you expect to have more or less influence with the new President?

PRIME MINISTER:

I think we influence one another. When you know you believe the same thing and you can discuss very freely and easily you can be very frank and you can query and say: “Is that quite right?”I think that that will go on. That is very valuable.

You know, having a good relationship does not mean that you automatically accept what one another says. It means you have got a sufficient basis of friendship to challenge what one another says [end p3] and to talk it through.

MARTIN BELL, BBC TV:

Have you invited Mr Bush to Britain?

PRIME MINISTER:

I have not yet invited him to Britain but I hope that he will come very much.