Speeches, Interviews & Other Statements

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1958 Oct 24 Fr
Margaret Thatcher

Speech to Whetstone Conservatives

Document type:public statement
Document kind:Speech
Venue:1487 High Road, Whetstone, N20
Source:Finchley Press, 24 October 1958
Journalist:-
Editorial comments:Item listed by date of publication. MT addressed the informal meeting "last week".
Importance ranking:Minor
Word count:296
Themes:General Elections

CANDIDATE SPEAKS

Last week Mrs. Margaret Thatcher (the prospective Conservative Parliamentary candidate for Finchley and Friern Barnet) made another visit to Whetstone.

The occasion was an informal meeting at 1487 High Road, Whetstone, N20, where Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Lowry were the hosts to many neighbours and friends who had come to meet Mrs. Thatcher.

Mrs. Thatcher outlined her work so far in Finchley and spoke on many of the major topics of the day. In particular she stressed that a 12,000 majority five years ago did not mean that it would be there again automatically after five years.

Many of those supporting voters had now left, and new ones had come on to the register who had to be won over.

A point made by Mrs. Thatcher was that she deplored those who said that their vote was "unnecessary". She urged that the total number of votes cast in the country for the Conservatives at the next General Election should not only return a Conservative Government, but show also numerically that the Conservatives had the confidence of the nation.

A warm welcome was given to Mrs. Thatcher and her husband when they arrived at the social held last Saturday evening at Gordon Hall, West Finchley, which had been arranged to give them an opportunity of meeting members of the Moss Hall ward.

Sir John Crowder, Member of Parliament for Finchley and Friern Barnet, accompanied by Lady Crowder, also arrived and were given a warm welcome.

Also at the social were Mr. C. H. Blatch, Divisional Chairman, and Major B. Nevard, Agent for the Division.

Raffles and a dutch auction conducted by Mrs. Thatcher brought in a useful sum for the ward funds.